Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Reflection

There were several things that can be reflected upon by this project. From the proposal to the blog, there were many things that went as planned, but other points that changed. In all, the study was successful overall.

The goal of the spring 2014 semester was to gather data while in Spain and use the information collected for a photo documentary blog. Each location selected was to have its own post within the blog with its location, cost, transportation, transportation cost from Segovia, Spain, accessibility of the location, the history of the location, and its cultural significance to Spain with a minimum of five hundred words per post and three photos with captions per location. The locations selected at the time of the proposal were the Acueducto de Segovia, Catedral de Segovia, Belchite, the Escorial Monastery and the Valley of the Fallen Monument, the Museo de Segovia, the Alcázar de Segovia, the Iglesia de Vera Cruz, Tenerife Island, the Granja de San Ildefonso, the Museo Arqueológico Nacional, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. This will be followed by a comparative analysis and conclusion to be completed in the fall 2014 semester as a final post, addressing how historic sites and museums are presented in Spain and how they are similar and differ from those in the United States.

In reality, the blog locations changed slightly from the original proposal. The locations of the Acueducto de Segovia, the Catedral de Segovia, the Escorial Monastery and the Valley of the Fallen Monument, the Museo de Segovia, the Alcázar de Segovia, the Iglesia de Vera Cruz, Tenerife Island, the Granja de San Ildefonso, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía were completed. However, being somewhat restricted by financial causes and public transportation made some of the locations difficult to plan. The city of Toledo was substituted in for Belchite due to transportation issues. The Museo Arqueológico Nacional was additionally not completed, as a result of the museum being closed to reconstruction.

Apart from the changes in locations, the blog overall went well. Each location was visited within its timeframe, followed by the blog post and corresponding photos. Each post met the criteria from the blog, which made the blog successful in meeting its requirements. With this, the analysis for the fall semester will be completed.


As a whole, the project was successful in its completion. Not everything went according to the proposal, but was completed to a full extent. Even with a few changes to the proposal locations, the general idea of the blog’s posts as how historic sites and museums are presented in Spain was accomplished. 

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía

Entrance

Method of Transportation: Bus to and from Segovia and Madrid, Metro to and from
                                          Príncipe Pío and Atocha Stations
Transportation Time: Approximately 2 hours (One Way)
Hours:
     Monday, Wednesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.
     Sunday 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Cost:
     Bus to and from Segovia and Madrid: $22.21/€16.10
     Metro to and from Príncipe Pío and Atocha Stations: $4.14/€3.00
     Entrance Fee: $10.96/€8.00
     Total Cost: $37.31/€27.10

The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, or the Reina Sofía Center of Art National Museum, is a modern art museum located in Madrid. Within walking distance of the Museo Nacional del Prado, the Reina Sofía first opened in 1990 although the building has been standing since the sixteenth century[1]. King Felipe II founded the San Carlos Hospital, the current museum headquarters, and King Carlos III in the eighteenth century decided to found another hospital and expand the area[2]. Construction halted after his death in 1788, but several modifications and additions were made while the hospital was in use up until its closing in 1965[3]. In 1977 the building was declared a national monument for its historic and artistic value and restoration began in 1980, later followed by its opening as the Reina Sofía Art Center in 1986[4].

Artwork in the Entrance

Under the Spanish Ministry of Culture, the Reina Sofía is home to its collections, temporary exhibits, audio visual activities, and educational programs. Officially created by Royal Decree 535/88 in 1988, the original collections were made up of works from the Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art and held only temporary exhibitions[5]. Since its opening, the museum has increased by about 60% of its surface area, now at 84,048 square meters, and has had its permanent collection since 1992 with close to 20,000 artworks throughout the museum[6]. It boasts works from Picasso, Dali, and many other contemporary artists from the twentieth century and beyond. Similar to the Museo Nacional del Prado, the Reina Sofía has many interactive online resources. In both Spanish and English, the visitor can map out their visit beforehand and view the collections by room at http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/collection.

The Collections

Unique to the Reina Sofía, one of its most important and well-protected works is the Guernica by Pablo Picasso. Painted in 1937 for the World’s Fair in Paris, the Guernica is symbolic of the suffering during the Spanish Civil War of the 1930’s[7]. A very controversial anti-fascist piece, Picasso himself said that when the Guernica was finished “it goes on changing, according to the state of mind of whoever is looking at it[8].” Although intended for the Spanish people, Picasso required that the painting be housed outside of Spain until Spain became democratic and had public liberties; it was housed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York until 1981, the centenary of Picasso’s birth[9]. Now located in the Reina Sofía, the Guernica is one of the most protected pieces of art in the museum. It has a separate exhibition hall with two guards, video surveillance, and motion detectors. Additionally, the Guernica has undergone computer-guided robot image and data collection to assess the materials and techniques Picasso used to create the Guernica[10]. Known as a masterpiece of the twentieth century, the Guernica is just one illustration of the many artworks of the Reina Sofía.

The Guernica

The Reina Sofía is important to preserving the cultural history of Spanish modern art. The building itself is important to the history of the area, along with its artworks. The Guernica is just one example of the museum’s importance. The Reina Sofía protects and maintains this history for its visitors and future generations.



Works Cited
  “History.” museoreinasofia.es. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2013. http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/museum/history. (accessed 6 April 2014).
“Guernica: Testimony of War.” pbs.org. PBS, 2014. http://www.pbs.org/treasuresoftheworld/a_nav/guernica_nav/main_guerfrm.html (accessed 7 April 2014).
“Journey to the inside of Guernica.” museoreinasofia.es. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2013. http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/collection/restoration/projects-investigation-development/jorney-inside-guernica (accessed 7 April 2014).




[1] “History,” museoreinasofia.es. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2013, http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/museum/history (accessed 6 April 2014).
[2] Ibid.
[3] Ibid.
[4] Ibid.
[5] Ibid.
[6] Ibid.
[7] “Guernica: Testimony of War,” pbs.org. PBS, 2014, http://www.pbs.org/treasuresoftheworld/a_nav/guernica_nav/main_guerfrm.html (accessed 7 April 2014).
[8] Ibid.
[9] Ibid.
[10] “Journey to the inside of Guernica,” museoreinasofia.es. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2013, http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/collection/restoration/projects-investigation-development/jorney-inside-guernica (accessed 7 April 2014). 

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Prado National Museum

Velázquez Entrance to the Prado

Method of Transportation: Bus to and from Segovia and Madrid, Metro to and from
                                          Príncipe Pío and Atocha Stations
Transportation Time: Approximately 2 hours (One Way)
Hours:
     Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
     Sundays and Festivals 10 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
     January 6, December 24 and 31 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Cost:
     Bus to and from Segovia and Madrid: $22.21/€16.10
     Metro to and from Príncipe Pío and Atocha Stations: $4.14/€3.00
     Entrance Fee:
          General $19.33/€14.00
          General with Guidebook $31.75/€23.00
          Reduced: $9.66/€7.00
          Student: Free with ID
     Total Cost:
           General: $45.68/€33.10
           General with Guidebook: $58.10/€42.10
           Reduced: $36.01/€26.10
           Student: $26.35/€19.10

The Museo Nacional del Prado, or the Prado National Museum, is one of the best known art museums. It contains over 8,000 artworks and is home to the most comprehensive collection of Spanish art in the world[1]. The building was first designed in 1785 by architect Juan de Villanueva as a National History Cabinet by order of King Charles III, but transitioned to the royal museum under his grandson King Ferdinand VII with influence of his wife Queen Maria Isabel de Braganza[2]. The museum was first named the National Museum of Paintings and Sculptures before being named the Prado National Museum and first opened to the public in November of 1819[3]. At the time of its opening, only three hundred and eleven paintings were on display with a collection of only 1,510 paintings from the royal residences[4].

Ticket Purchase

Since then, the Prado’s collections have significantly expanded. Not only does the Prado contain paintings, but it includes sculpture, drawings, engravings, coins and metals, clothing, and decorative art throughout the museum from the eleventh through nineteenth centuries[5]. With Spanish, Italian, Dutch, German, English, and French artworks, the Prado is comprised of many different schools of art as well[6]. Some of the most notable artists include Spanish artists Velázquez, Goya, and El Greco, Raphael, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Van Der Weyden, and many others. In 2007, the museum’s exhibition area was expanded by more than 50% to include an entrance hall, four rooms of temporary exhibits, an auditorium, the restored cloister of the church of Los Jerónimos, and storage and restoration space[7].

Prado Events

Even though the Prado is a large museum, the Prado website has many interactive sites to help visitors plan their visits and manage their time there. Both in Spanish and English, the same as the museum itself, the website has a collections plan and guides of what to see within a given amount of time. The collections plan is similar to the free map at the museum and can be located at https://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/plan-de-colecciones-2009-2012/. It tells the overall layout after collection changes were made in 2012 and allows the viewer to see the different floors of the museum. It conveys the location of different types of artwork and artists, with specific paintings highlighted. The guide of what to see can be found at https://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/what-to-see/ and outlines what it recommends to see within one, two, and three hour visits.

Main Entrance

Protecting and displaying artwork for future generations, the Prado is one of the most famous landmarks in Madrid and Spain. It has changed over the centuries to encompass many different types of art and has expanded in recent years. With over 8,000 pieces of art, the Prado is extremely important to the cultural and artistic history of Spain.



Works Cited
  “Historia del Museo.” museodelprado.es. Museo Nacional del Prado, 2014. https://www.museodelprado.es/la-institucion/historia-del-museo/. (accessed 6 April 2014).
“Museums and Art Centres.” esmadrid.com. MADRID DESTINO CULTURA TURISMO Y NEGOCIO, 2014. http://www.esmadrid.com/en/prado-museum. (accessed 6 April 2014).
“Prado Museum.” spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014. http://www.spain.info/en_US/que-quieres/arte/museos/madrid/museo_nacional_del_prado.html. (accessed 6 April 2014).




[1] “Museums and Art Centres,” esmadrid.com. MADRID DESTINO CULTURA TURISMO Y NEGOCIO, 2014, http://www.esmadrid.com/en/prado-museum (accessed 6 April 2014).
[2] “Historia del Museo,” museodelprado.es. Museo Nacional del Prado, 2014, https://www.museodelprado.es/la-institucion/historia-del-museo/ (accessed 6 April 2014).
[3] Ibid.
[4] Ibid.
[5] “Museums and Art Centres,” esmadrid.com. MADRID DESTINO CULTURA TURISMO Y NEGOCIO, 2014.
[6] “Prado Museum,” spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en_US/que-quieres/arte/museos/madrid/museo_nacional_del_prado.html (accessed 6 April 2014).
[7] Ibid.

Friday, March 28, 2014

La Granja de San Ildefonso

Map of the Granja

Method of Transportation: Inter-Segovia Bus
Transportation Time: Approximately 20 Minutes
Hours:
    Palace:
          April - September Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
          October - March Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
     Gardens:
          November - February Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
          March Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
          April Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
          May - June 15 Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
          June 16 - August Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.
          September Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
          October Tuesday - Sunday 10 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Cost:
     Transportation: $6.30/€4.58
     Entrance Fee:
          Palace:
             General: $12.38/€9.00
             Reduced: $5.50/€4.00
          Gardens:
             General: $6.19/€4.50
             Reduced: $3.44/€2.50
     Total Cost:
          General: $24.87/€18.08
          Reduced: $15.24/€11.08



A former royal residence, the Granja de San Ildefonso is one of the many significant landmarks Spain. It is located in the Sierra de Guadarrama Mountains in the providence of Segovia[1]. Before becoming the Granja de San Ildefonso, the area was first used by King Henry IV in the 15th century[2]. It was later given to the Hieronymite monks of El Parral by Queen Isabella I where it was used as a “granja” or farm[3]. Modeled after the court of Versailles by King Philip V, the Granja de San Ildefonso, or simply the Granja, is a unique and impressive complex[4].

Royal Palace

One of the most notable buildings in the Granja is the royal palace. It was built by King Philip V in the 18th century, who was the first Bourbon monarch of Spain and from France[5]. The palace was used as a summer residence up until the rein of Alfonso XIII and combines French and Spanish baroque style architecture[6]. Due to a fire, the first rooms that were destroyed beyond repair were converted into a tapestry museum; since the Granja was used as a summer palace, the tapestries are not original to the Granja as tapestries were meant to keep in warmth[7]. Spain has one of the oldest and largest tapestry collections in Europe, some dating back to the late 15th and early 16th centuries, and the tapestry museum is home to many of these unique tapestries. The palace additionally contains 18th century paintings and the remains of Philip V and his second wife in the adjoining church[8].

View from the Gardens

Apart from the royal palace, the Granja has many other places to visit. One of these places is the gardens. The gardens surround the royal palace and were created by Philip V in the French style of Versailles, containing twenty-six fountains[9]. The Granja, in addition, contains the Granja Royal Glass Factory. Created in the 18th century, it now contains exhibitions over the art of glass-making[10].

One of Twenty-Six Fountains

The Granja de San Ildefonso is one of the unique complexes to visit in the Segovia providence. From the palace to the gardens to the glass factory, the Granja has a wide variety of things to see. Helping to preserve its history, the Granja is an important part of the area.



Works Cited
“GARDENS AT LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/jardines-historicos/segovia/la_granja_de_san_ildefonso.html (accessed 27 March 2014).
“LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO ROYAL PALACE,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/monumentos/segovia/palacio_real_de_la_granja_de_san_ildefonso.html (accessed 27 March 2014).
“SAN ILDEFONSO AND LA GRANJA,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/ciudades-pueblos/otros-destinos/san_ildefonso_o_la_granja.html (accessed 27 March 2014).





[1] “SAN ILDEFONSO AND LA GRANJA,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/ciudades-pueblos/otros-destinos/san_ildefonso_o_la_granja.html (accessed 27 March 2014).
[2] “LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO ROYAL PALACE,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/monumentos/segovia/palacio_real_de_la_granja_de_san_ildefonso.html (accessed 27 March 2014).
[3] Ibid.
[4] “SAN ILDEFONSO AND LA GRANJA,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014.
[5] “LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO ROYAL PALACE,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014.
[6] “SAN ILDEFONSO AND LA GRANJA,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014.
[7] Ibid.
[8] Ibid.
[9] “GARDENS AT LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/jardines-historicos/segovia/la_granja_de_san_ildefonso.html (accessed 27 March 2014).
[10] “SAN ILDEFONSO AND LA GRANJA,” Spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Tenerife, Canary Islands

Tenerife


Method of Transportation: Plane from Madrid to Tenerife North Airport
Transportation Time: Approximately 2.5 Hours
Cost:
     Bus to and from Segovia and Madrid: $22.21/€16.10
     Metro to and from Madrid and Airport: $13.79/€10.00
     Plane: $175.74/€127.40
     Hotel (Two Nights): $70.85/€51.36
     Total: $282.59/€204.86

As one of two islands of that are a part of Spain, the Canary Islands have a very distinct history. Located in the Atlantic Ocean near the western part of Africa, the islands were colonized by Europeans in the beginning of the 11th century and have been under Spanish control since 1496[1]. Used as a stopping point between Asia, Africa, and the Americas, the Canary Islands became a major part of the economy and had been similarly used by Christopher Columbus on his journeys to the Americas[2]. One of the largest and main areas of the Canary Islands is Tenerife.

Tenerife Geography

Tenerife is located in the center of the Canary Islands. The island, like all of the Canary Islands, is a volcanic island and Tenerife has had four recorded volcanic eruptions in 1704, 1706, 1798, and 1909[3]. With forty-two natural protected spaces and a national park, Tenerife has a very diverse geography[4]. One of the most notable geographic landmarks of Tenerife is the Teide National Park. Mount Teide, at 3,718 meters high, is the highest peak in Spain and the third highest volcanic structure in the world[5]. The park itself is a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage Site and it is possible to visit both the park and Mount Teide[6]. Access to Mount Teide is restricted to a permit for a specific date and period of time, but there are parts of the park that are not restricted. The permits can be obtained online at www.reservasparquesnacionales.es and are needed for both walking by foot and using the cable car to reach the peak[7].

Museo de Historia de Tenerife

Not only is Tenerife known for its geography, but it is known for its cities as well. One of the main cities of Tenerife is San Cristóbal de La Laguna, commonly known as La Laguna. The original capital of Tenerife, La Laguna is a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage Site[8]. Used as a layout for many of the “New World” colony cities, La Laguna has buildings dating from 1546[9]. La Laguna also has the Museo de Historia de Tenerife, or the Tenerife History Museum. Here the visitor can learn everything about the history of the island and their influence on Spain. The museum is in Spanish, but there are free guidebooks in different languages available along with the free entry. Since Tenerife is the only one of the Canary Islands that has archival documentation leading back to European conquest, the museum contains the earliest records of the settlement of Tenerife. Apart from La Laguna, another major city of Tenerife is Santa Cruz. The capital city, Santa Cruz is located in the northeastern part of Tenerife. Santa Cruz is one of the most historically important harbors of the Atlantic Ocean in Tenerife, crucial to trade and economic commerce during the 19th century[10].  Today, Santa Cruz is known for carnival, a festival celebrated every year in either February or March[11]. Considered to be one of the largest celebrations in the world, Santa Cruz’s carnival celebration is one of the most important festivals in the island[12].

16th Century Documentation

From geography to cities, the island of Tenerife is an important and distinct part of Spanish history. With its two world heritage sites and natural protected spaces, Tenerife has many geographical monuments. A crucial part to Spain’s economy, Tenerife has been a part of Atlantic Ocean trade routes since early European colonization and remains an important part of Spain’s cultural and historical past.


Works Cited
“Ascending the Teide.” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010. http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/places-interest/teide-national-park/ascension+a+la+cumbre.htm. (accessed March 21, 2014).
“Events: Volcanic Eruptions.” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010. http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/about-tenerife/history/events/las+erupciones+volcanicas.htm. (accessed March 21, 2014).
“History.” turismodecanarias.com. Turismo de Canarias, 2014. http://www.turismodecanarias.com/canary-islands-spain/tourist-guide/history-origins/. (accessed March 21, 2014).
 “Santa Cruz.” spain-tenerife.com. spain-tenerife.com, 2014. http://www.spain-tenerife.com/UK/santa-cruz.html. (accessed March 21, 2014).
“Teide National Park.” unesco.org. UNESCO, 2014. http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1258. (accessed March 21, 2014).
“Tenerife Island.” turismodecanarias.com. Turismo de Canarias, 2014. http://www.turismodecanarias.com/canary-islands-spain/tourism-office/tenerife-island/. (accessed March 21, 2014).
“Walking Routes.” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010. http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/activities/routes-and-excursions/walking-routes/por+el+casco+historico+de+la+laguna.htm. (accessed March 21, 2014).





[1] “History,” turismodecanarias.com. Turismo de Canarias, 2014, http://www.turismodecanarias.com/canary-islands-spain/tourist-guide/history-origins/ (accessed March 21, 2014).
[2] Ibid.
[3] “Events: Volcanic Eruptions,” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010, http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/about-tenerife/history/events/las+erupciones+volcanicas.htm (accessed March 21, 2014).
[4] “Tenerife Island,” turismodecanarias.com. Turismo de Canarias, 2014, http://www.turismodecanarias.com/canary-islands-spain/tourism-office/tenerife-island/ (accessed March 21, 2014).
[5] “Teide National Park,” unesco.org. UNESCO, 2014, http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1258 (accessed March 21, 2014).
[6] Ibid.
[7] “Ascending the Teide,” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010, http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/places-interest/teide-national-park/ascension+a+la+cumbre.htm (accessed March 21, 2014).
[8] “Walking Routes,” webtenerife.co. Tenerife Tourism Corporation, 2010, http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/activities/routes-and-excursions/walking-routes/por+el+casco+historico+de+la+laguna.htm (accessed March 21, 2014).
[9] Ibid.
[10] “Santa Cruz,” spain-tenerife.com. spain-tenerife.com, 2014, http://www.spain-tenerife.com/UK/santa-cruz.html (accessed March 21, 2014).
[11] Ibid.
[12] Ibid.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Church of Vera Cruz


La Iglesia de Vera Cruz

Method of Transportation: Walking
Transportation Time: Approximately 20 Minutes
Hours:
     April - September 10:30-1:30, 4:00-7:00
     October - March 10:30-1:30, 4:00-6:00
     Closed Mondays
Cost:
     $2.74/€2.00
     Free Tuesday Afternoons


The Church of the Vera Cruz, or the Iglesia de la Vera Cruz, is one of the oldest churches in Segovia. It was built starting in 1208 by the Caballeros de la Orden del Santo Sepulcro, or the Knights of the Order of the Holy Sepulcher, which is sometimes also attributed to the Knights Templar[1]. It is known for its unusual size as the church is built as a twelve sided polygon, differing from the other churches in Segovia. As one of the “best-preserved of its kind in Europe,” the Church of the Vera Cruz is noted for its historic importance[2].

Entrance


The design of the Church of the Vera Cruz is important to its structure. Built in a Romanesque style, the church has three individual chapels, a two story temple, and a bell tower that was added in the sixteenth century[3]. With Muslim inspired paintings and architecture, the Church of the Vera Cruz has a very “sober and exciting” interior[4]. There is also a stone alter that is decorated with interlaced arches supported by twisted columns in the center of the church[5]. The architecture alone makes the church unique, as well as its distinct structure.  

Unique Architecture 


The church has not only undergone structural changes over the centuries, but has also changed ownership reflective of the different times. After the dissolution the original order that had constructed the church, the Church of the Vera Cruz was given to the Orden de San Juan de Jerusalén, or the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, in 1317; the original order dissolved due to lack of leadership and eventual papal annulment[6]. In 1489, the ownership of the church was officially changed to the Orden de San Juan, or the Order of St. John, by Pope Innocent VIII, but the change did not occur until 1531[7]. The Church of the Vera Cruz remained under the Order of St. John until it was abandoned in 1836[8]. Eighty-three years later in 1919, King Alfonso XIII declared the Church of the Vera Cruz a national monument, but it was not in use until 1951[9]. Currently, the chapter of San Juan Baustista is in charge of the church under the Asamblea Española, or Spanish Assembly[10].


View of the Alcázar


Visible from the Alcázar, the Church of the Vera Cruz is fairly accessible by walking and car. The view from the church also gives a panoramic view of the city near the Alcázar, as well as the surrounding countryside. The church has undergone many structural and ownership changes over the centuries, but still remains as one of the best preserved of its kind. One of the more distinctive churches in Segovia, the Church of the Vera Cruz is also known for its history and design.




Works Cited
“Iglesia de la Vera Cruz.” turismodesegovia.com. Turismo de Segovia, 2014. http://www.turismodesegovia.com/que-ver/monumentos/iglesias-y-monasterios#siete. (accessed February 23, 2014).
“IGLESIA DE LA VERA CRUZ (Segovia).” ordendemalta.es. Orden de Malta, 2014. http://www.ordendemalta.es/story.php?id=446. (accessed February 23, 2014).

 “Vera Cruz Church.” spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014. http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/monumentos/segovia/iglesia_de_la_vera_cruz.html. (accessed February 23, 2014).
  




[1] “Iglesia de la Vera Cruz,” turismodesegovia.com. Turismo de Segovia, 2014, http://www.turismodesegovia.com/que-ver/monumentos/iglesias-y-monasterios#siete (accessed February 23, 2014).
[2] “Vera Cruz Church,” spain.info. Sociedad Estatal para la Gestión de la Innovación y las Tecnologías Turísticas, 2014, http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/monumentos/segovia/iglesia_de_la_vera_cruz.html (accessed February 23, 2014).
[3] “IGLESIA DE LA VERA CRUZ (Segovia),” ordendemalta.es. Orden de Malta, 2014, http://www.ordendemalta.es/story.php?id=446 (accessed February 23, 2014).
[4] “Iglesia de la Vera Cruz,” turismodesegovia.com. Turismo de Segovia, 2014.
[5] “IGLESIA DE LA VERA CRUZ (Segovia),” ordendemalta.es. Orden de Malta, 2014.
[6] Ibid.
[7] Ibid.
[8] Ibid.
[9] Ibid.
[10] Ibid.